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Isaac VAN METER
Birth:
24 Sep 1794
Old Fields, Hardy co, Va, Usa
Death:
8 Oct 1854
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Burial:
VanMeter-Cunningham Cemetery, VanMeter Road, Clark co, Ky, Usa
Marriage:
17 Jun 1817
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Individual Information
Notes:
                   age 55


Isaac Van Meter came to Kentucky at age 23 and Married Rebecca Cunningham. He had 15 Children , 10 lived to be adults.

Dates of birth, marriage and death, and names of children, as listed in VanMeter Family Bible. Family bible in possession of Betsy Woodford Lankford, Paris, Kentucky.


Native of Hardy County, VA, moved to Clark County, KY as a young man, where he engaged in farming and stock breeding, and was among the first to introduce shorthorn cattle to the State; for many years a deacon in the Presbyterian Church; an old line Whig.  W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, Kentucky A History of the State, 4th ed., p. 1029 (F. A. Batley and Co., Louisville & Chicago 1887)(reprinted Southern Historical Press, Greenville, SC 1979, 1992).

Benjamin F. VanMeter, Genealogies and Biographical Sketches, pp. 64-65 (Louisville, 1901): "Isaac, the father of the writer of this, was the third child and eldest son of Colonel Jacob and his wife, Tabitha, and was born in old Fort Pleasant, Hardy County, in what is now West Virginia, September 24, 1794. He received a good English education from the best teachers that could be obtained in that country at that time, and received a thorough training from his father in the best mode of farming and the care and attention of live stock.

"Even at this early day this valley was producing the finest beef and pork, which supplied the Philadelphia and Baltimore markets. This fertile valley produced enormous crops of corn and wheat, and the very finest of clover and bluegrass pasture, nearly all of which grain and grass was consumed by the best of live stock that could be had at that time, and they were driven to one or the other of these markets and yielded very remunerative profits.

"My father was very early initiated into the Philadelphia and Baltimore markets with fat cattle and hogs of such stock as commanded the top of the market.

"But when about twenty-three years of age he came to Kentucky, married Rebecca, the only daughter of Captain Isaac Cunningham, of Clark County, took up his abode with him on his farm about four miles northwest of Winchester, and in this county he spent the remainder of his life.

. . .

"Isaac Van Meter brought with him to Kentucky about seven thousand dollars' worth of property, consisting chiefly of negro slaves, horse stock, and money. He and Captain Isaac Cunningham were for many years equal partners in their business affairs. They were very successful in business, and accumulated a very large and valuable estate, consisting principally of land and slaves. When they finally dissolved partnership and divided their lands, each owned more than one thousand acres of as valuable lands as were in Clark County. They resided on adjoining farms, with their residences less than one mile apart. Captain Cunningham having only one child (my mother), the grandparents bestowed full as much parental care on the grandchildren as did the father and mother, and it was seldom that all of the children were at one time at either one of the residences."
                  
Rebecca CUNNINGHAM
Birth:
14 Oct 1800
Hardy co, Va, Usa
Death:
20 Feb 1864
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Burial:
VanMeter-Cunningham Cemetery, VanMeter Road, Clark co, Ky, Usa
Individual Information
Notes:
                   age 50


Rebecca Cunningham moved to Kentucky With her parents in 1802 and at age 17 yrs. married Isaac Van Meter  by Rev. William W. Martin.

"Rebecca, daughter of Captain Isaac Cunningham and his wife, Sarah, was born in Hardy County, Virginia, October 14, 1800, and removed with her parents to Clark County, Kentucky, in 1802, where she was reared to the age of seventeen years, when she was married to Isaac Van Meter, of Hardy County, Virginia, by the Rev. William W. Martin, on June 17, 1817." Benjamin F. VanMeter, Genealogies and Biographical Sketches, p. 65 (Louisville, 1901).

Dates of birth, marriage, and death, and names and dates of birth of children from VanMeter Family Bible. Louis Marshall VanMeter family bible gives year of death as 1865.
                  
Children
Marriage
1
Birth:
10 Jul 1818
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
14 Sep 1859
Fayette co, Ky, Usa
Marr:
1 Mar 1854
Montgomery co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   or 10 Aug 1818

Section D, lot 63, part W


Relationship to Isaac VanMeter and Rebecca Cunningham as shown in VanMeter Family Bible. Date of birth from VanMeter Family Bible. Date of death from tombstone, Lexington [KY] Cemetery.

Names of wives and children from G & BS, pp. 65-66, see also Deed of Partition and Division, Deed Book 104, Page 346, Fayette County [KY] Clerk's office: Solomon VanMeter died intestate in Fayette County, Kentucky on September 14, 1859, children and heirs: John S. VanMeter (and his wife, Lizzie M. VanMeter) of Ray County, Missouri; Lizzie M. Nicholas (widow of Capt. W. D. Nicholas) of Fayette County, Kentucky; Lucy H. V. Kerr (widow of Dr. E. M. Kerr) of Callaway County, Missouri; Isaac C. VanMeter, Jr. (widower) of Clark County, Kentucky; Nelson P. VanMeter (and his wife, Lizzie C. VanMeter) of Clark County, Kentucky; and Solomon L. VanMeter (and his wife, Evie T. VanMeter) of Fayette County, Kentucky; widow of Solomon VanMeter, Martha C. subsequently married William R. Estill and died May 21, 1894.

He lived most of his life in Fayette County, Kentucky, three miles north of Lexington on a farm called Duncastle. He was a prominent and successful farmer, and for many years was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. He died September, 1859. He was chosen as the agent from Clark County (where he was residing at the time and where he was born and reared) to go to England, along with Nelson Dudley, of Fayette County, and Charles T. Garrard, of Bourbon County, to select and import shorthorn cattle and other blooded stock for the Northern Kentucky Importing Company, and they made an importation which paid more than 100 per cent net profit. He was a fine judge of cattle; a very enterprising and intelligent man; highly esteemed by all of his acquaintances. G&BS, p. 66.
                  
2
Birth:
8 Oct 1820
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
14 Apr 1898
Fayette co, Ky, Usa
Notes:
                   Section D, Lot 74

age 30


Lived with maternal grandmother: Sarah (nee Harness) Cunningham

Isaac C. Van Meter Represented Fayette Co. in the Ky. Legislature and was and elder in the first Presbyterian Church of Lexington.

Dates of birth and death from VanMeter Family Bible and tombstone. Names of children from Benjamin F. VanMeter, Genealogies and Biographical Sketches, p. 81.

Second child of Isaac VanMeter and Rebecca Cunningham, lived from a child with his maternal grandfather; in 1842, married Frances H. Hull (born in Franklin County, VA, daughter of Col. Henry Hull and Hannah Harness, her parents died in Virginia and she came to Kentucky in 1833); in 1843, moved to Fayette County and purchased land in the Sandersville precinct, where he has since remained; on farm of 800 acres, 5½ miles from Lexington, near the Versailles Pike, breeds short horn cattle and trotting horses, and of the latter, especially Hambletonians; a practical, business-like stock-raiser; member, Presbyterian church; nine children, daughter, Sarah, married to John W. Steenbergen, lives in West Virginia, son, Charles is a farmer in Clark County, KY, two other sons, W. Scott and Ben W. are farming in Bates County, MO, other children still live at home: Edwin, J. Brown, Lewis M., Jesse, and Fannie M. Robert Peter, History of Fayette County, p. 866 (O. H. Baskin Co., Chicago 1882).
                  
3
Birth:
10 Feb 1822
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
19 Oct 1849
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Marr:
20 Oct 1846
 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Died without issue. G&BS, p. 84. Buried VanMeter Cemetery, VanMeter Road, Clark County, Kentucky.
                  
4
VAN METER
Birth:
23 Oct 1823
Death:
28 Oct 1823
 
Marr:
 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   As listed in Rebecca Cunningham VanMeter Family Bible. No name given, listed only as "The 4th a daughter born the 23rd day of Octr 1823 and died the 28th Octr 1823."
                  
5
Birth:
26 Oct 1825
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
21 Jun 1844
Fayette co, Ky, Usa
Marr:
25 Jul 1843
Clark co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Dates of birth, marriage, and death from Rebecca Cunningham VanMeter Family Bible.  Benjamin F. VanMeter,  "Genealogies and Biographical Sketches," p. 83:  "Sarah Ann, eldest daughter of Isaac and Rebecca, was born October 26, 1825; married Dr. John Hall, son of Rev. Nathan Hall, of Fayette County, Kentucky, July 25, 1843.  They removed to Illinois immediately after their marriage, and returned to Kentucky on a visit about one year afterwards, when she was taken sick and died at the residence of the Rev. Nathan Hall, in Fayette County, leaving no issue."  Buried VanMeter Cemetery, VanMeter Road, Clark County, Kentucky.
                  
6
Birth:
1 Aug 1827
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
7 Mar 1907
Lexington, Fayette co, Ky, Usa
Marr:
15 Apr 1846
Clark co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Lot 47, Section 9

age 23


Obituary, Lexington Herald, p. 6, Friday, March 8, 1907:    " Mrs. Susan T. Allen, aged 79 years, widow of the late Dr. A. S. Allen of this city, died last night at 9 o'clock at her residence on West Second Street after an illness of three weeks brought on by an attack of the grippe. The funeral services will be held at the Second Presbyterian Church Saturday morning at 11 o'clock, and the interment will take place in the Lexington cemetery.

"Mrs. Allen was one of the most widely known women in this city, primarily because of her charity, and because of her eccentricities. She had been in ill health for a number of years, and conceived the idea that riding on the street cars would be beneficial to her. It was learned from one of her most intimate friends last night that during the last fifteen years, she had ridden on the street cars in this city an average of ten miles each day, and during that time had probably traveled 60,000 miles.

"She leaves an estate variously estimated at from $40,000 to $60,000, which will be divided among her relatives as she leaves no will. She was the daughter of the late Benjamin [sic] Van Meter, who was one of the pioneers of Clark county, and was one of the most prominent men of his day. He was the original importer of Shorthorn cattle into Kentucky.

"Mrs. Allen is survived by her brothers, B. F. Van Meter of this county; L. M. Van Meter of Shelbyville, J. M. Van Meter of Danville, and Abraham Van Meter of Gainesville, Tex. There are a number of her nieces and nephews who live here, among them being Hon. Sol. Van Meter, Dr. Benjamin Van Meter, William Nicholas and others."

No children. "Genealogies and Biographical Sketches, p. 83."

Dates of birth and death from tombstone. Also VanMeter Family Bible.

As it turns out, Aunt Sue did leave a will and and her relatives did not divide her estate. Lexington Herald, p. 1, Saturday, November 28, 1908:  "  Colonel Allan anticipated that the plaintiffs would allege testamentary incapacity and undue influence.  As to the latter he said that Mr. Loughridge did not know until some years after the will was written that he was named as the ultimate beneficiary.  After the will was signed it was given to Mr. Sidney Scott for safe keeping and he held it until his death.  In 1896 Mrs. Allan added the codicil, the form of which Colonel Allan outlined at her direction, and after that until her death two years ago, he was custodian of it.  As to capacity, he said that Mrs. Allan was a woman of unusual attainments and strength of mind and remarked for her positive likes and dislikes.

"  From a time before the will was made until her death Colonel Allen said that Mr. Loughridge was nearer to Mrs. Allan than her brothers and sisters, who were not affectionately regarded by her because she considered that she had been unjustly treated in the division of her father's estate.  [Note:  Aunt Sue's last surviving sister had died in 1847. See also Allan v VanMeter's Devisees, 58 Ky. 264 (1858)(Isaac VanMeter in his will treated his sons better than he treated his daughter, and the Court of Appeals held that a number of devises created under the will of Isaac Cunningham did not pass under the terms of that will to the other grandchildren equally, but instead passed through Isaac VanMeter's will such that Aunt Sue did not share)].  He said that this antagonism was especially marked between her and Mr. B. F. VanMeter, whose name leads in the roll of plaintiffs.  He said that she received no kindness or attention from her relatives for many years before her death, and there was no exchange of visits.  Under the law he said that a person had the right to will property to whom she chose.   In the prime of life she wrote the will giving her estate to Mr. Loughridge and ratified that choice twenty years later. . . .

"    The statement of what those who attack the will shall undertake to prove embodied sensational allegations.  Colonel Bronston said that duty to his clients imposed a disagreeable duty.  Instead of the case being as Colonel Allen had outlined, he said that he hoped the jury would never again have to hear a story such as the one of which this document is an incident.  He spoke of the early affectionate relations of Mrs. Allan to her family, of her advantages and her marriage to Dr. Allan.  In the settlement of her father's estate he said that if there was any inequality in shares it was in her favor, she receiving a splendid tract of land on the Lexington and Winchester pike.

"     Although Mrs. Allan was a woman of mental strength he said that she was not without a marked eccentricity that was manifest before she knew Mr. Loughridge.  With utter innocence of wrong he said she was susceptible to unreasoning affection.  Before Mr. Loughridge came to Lexington he said that she had this affection for a young man from Clark County, whom she treated like a son, and offered to give him and a niece her entire estate if they were married.  Colonel Bronston said that this and the subsequent will devising the estate to Mr. Loughridge established that she did not appreciate the value of her estate and did not appreciate her obligations to her blood kin, which constitute testamentary incapacity.

"  'That will is no more the will of Mrs. Allan than it is my will,' said Colonel Bronston.  'She merely wrote the copy after another had carefully drawn it.  After copying it she waited and resisted an influence two years before she would sign it.'

"Colonel Bronston said that it would be proved that Mr. Loughridge had exercised a controlling influence over Mrs. Allan almost from the time he entered the household, and that this was possible from the alleged mental defect of Mrs. Allan.  The codicil, he said, was all that kept the will being void, and that an astute lawyer detected and furnished the remedy for this flaw.

"    Mrs. Allan's last years [were] spent in privation, said Colonel Bronston.  She lived in want in the back room of her residence on High Street without the comforts of good food, clothing or fuel.  He said that she employed no cook , did not spend over $100 a year, bought coal in drib lots and believed she was not only poor, but a beneficiary of Mr. Loughridge.  Eccentricities were manifested in bathing her body with codliver oil and riding all day on street cars.  He said she would imagine that the car belonged to her, would give orders and sometimes strike those who . . . .[transposed line omitted].  As to her income, he said that for 33 years she received a rental of $1,000 per year for her farm in Clark County; $5,000 damages from the L. & E. Railway Company for crossing her land, and sold her residence on High Street for $12,000.

"     He said the testimony would show that she did not receive or enjoy the benefits of this money, and that when she got money from the bank she gave notes for the sums drawn.  The proof would further show, he said, that she believed that she was indebted to Mr. Loughridge to the sum of $10,000 and that he had made the statement to one of her relatives that she owed him several thousand dollars.  As to the kindness of Mr. Loughridge to her, Colonel Bronston said that it would be shown that she was treated as a supernumerary and a nuisance and had not been inside of his home for years or recipient of attention from his family.

. . .

"    Between thirty and sixty thousand dollars is involved in the contest. The plaintiffs, who were not beneficiaries, alleged undue influence and incapacity.

"Mrs. Allan died about two years ago, and her will leaves all of her estate, except $2,500 in three legacies, to W. J. Loughridge.  Mr. Tanner is a party defendant because executor of the estate.  This is the first trial of the case."

Lexington Herald, p. 3, Thursday, December 3, 1908:    "   Cross-examination of Mr. B. F. VanMeter occupied the entire day in Circuit Court in the trial of the Allan will case yesterday.  He reiterated his belief that Mrs. Susan T. Allan, his sister, did not have testamentary capacity when her will was made in 1874-76 and not later in her life.  He said that impairment of mind was manifested as early as 1866, and as evidence of the alleged peculiarity of mind spoke of what he said was the unreasoning motherly affection of Mrs. Allan for certain young men, whom he said she setted [?] and tried to arrange marriages for.  It is the effort of the contestants to establish incapacity, and the cross-examination was directed to weakening alleged evidence of this.

"At the present rate of progress the trial will continue next week.  As a legal battle it will rank with noted cases in this court.  Mr. VanMeter has been examined at great length concerning the holdings of his father and grandfather and the distribution of their estates under will."

Lexington Herald, p. 8, Sunday, March 6, 1910;    "   After about 35 minutes deliberations ten of the eleven jurors returned a verdict in the Fayette Circuit Court yesterday afternoon at 12:45 o'clock sustaining the will of Mrs. Susan T. Allan. . . ."

[Note:    William J. Loughridge, age 72, buried June 24, 1928, Lexington Cemetery, Lot D, Section 109].
                  
7
Rebecca Hannah VAN METER
Birth:
27 Jan 1829
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
5 Feb 1847
Clark co, Ky, Usa
 
Marr:
 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Dates of birth and death as listed in Rebecca Cunningham VanMeter Family Bible.
                  
8
Amanda Ellis VAN METER
Birth:
25 Oct 1830
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
26 Aug 1831
Clark co, Ky, Usa
 
Marr:
 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Dates of birth and death as listed in Rebecca Cunningham VanMeter Family Bible. "[O]nly sick 3 days, A trial indeed."
                  
9
William Cunningham VAN METER
Birth:
16 Jun 1832
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
4 Jul 1844
Clark co, Ky, Usa
 
Marr:
 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Dates of birth and death as listed in Rebecca Cunningham VanMeter Family Bible.
                  
10
Birth:
30 Jan 1834
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
1 Oct 1927
Lexington, Fayette co, Ky, Usa
Marr:
30 Nov 1854
Clark co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Ky. Soc. DAR 1968

age 16


Educated at Centre College; at age of nineteen accompanied brother, Solomon, to England, who had been appointed to a commission to import shorthorn cattle to Kentucky; extensive farm of 2,000 acres, noted for its fine stock, and its system of cultivation and improvement; for many years one of the most prominent Kentuckian engaged in the breeding of shorthorn stock; selected by the Saddle and Sirloin Club of Chicago as one of four Americans who had done the most to improve the breed of beef cattle in this country; lived for many years in Lexington, and was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. Charles Kerr, 3 History of Kentucky, p. 391 (American Historical Society, Chicago & New York 1922).

Author: Diary, A Voyage to Europe (1853); Genealogies and Biographical Sketches (of Some Old Families Who Have Taken Prominent Part in the Development of Virginia and Kentucky Especially, And Later of Many Other States Of This Union (John P. Morton & Co., Louisville 1901); A Dead Issue and the Live One (The Bradley & Gilbert Co., Louisville 1914).

Obituary, Lexington Herald, p. 1, Sunday, October 2, 1927:  Died at 4:00 a.m. at residence, 225 Ashland Avenue, Lexington, after an illness of a few days; native of Clark County, son of Isaac VanMeter and Rebecca Cunningham; lived in Fayette County for many years; engaged in stock farming and cattle dealing, specializing in the raising of Shorthorn cattle; alumnus of Centre College; elder and charter member of Maxwell Street Presbyterian Church; Children listed in obituary are "three daughters, Emma VanMeter Hamilton, of Lexington, who is now in California; Mrs. Annette VanMeter Pettit and Miss Mabelle VanMeter, both of Lexington; and four sons, Everett L. VanMeter, of Ogden, Utah; T.W.L. VanMeter and Joseph Clay VanMeter, of Lexington, and Dr. B.F. VanMeter, Jr., of Lexington, who is now at Asheville, N.C. Senator Arch L. Hamilton is a grandson of Mr. VanMeter." Pallbearers were Arch Hamilton, Benjamin VanMeter, Prewitt VanMeter, William Pettit, Emanuel VanMeter and Field VanMeter.
                  
11
Birth:
29 Oct 1835
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
15 Jun 1904
Eminence, Henry co, Ky, Usa
Marr:
13 Mar 1855
Garrard co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   age 14


Date of birth from VanMeter Family Bible.  Names of wife and child from G&BS, p. 111.

1860 U. S. Census, District 2, Clark County, Kentucky: age 24, occupation farmer, value of real estate $13,300, personal estate, $15,000, born Kentucky; included in household: Orpah P. age 21, born Kentucky.

1870 U. S. Census, Winchester Precinct, Clark County, Kentucky (Roll 456, Book 1, page 111): age 35, occupation farmer, value of real estate $81,400, personal estate, $10,700; included in household: Orpha P., age 32, keeping house, and Lena K., age 5.

1880 U. S. Census, Pleasureville, Henry County, Kentucky:     age 44, occupation farmer, born in Kentucky; included in household: Orpah P., age 42, keeping house, and Lena K., age 15.

Appears in 1900 U.S. Census for Eminence, Henry County, Kentucky, p. 261.

Date of death from C. Price Meek, Henry County, Kentucky Cemeteries (Henry County Historical Society, Eminence, KY 1995); Louis Marshall VanMeter family bible states date of death as June 14, 1904.
                  
12
Eliza Caroline VAN METER
Birth:
13 Sep 1837
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
25 Oct 1841
Clark co, Ky, Usa
 
Marr:
 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   	1  CAUS Scarlet Fever
	2  SOUR S129



Dates of birth and death  from VanMeter Family Bible and Genealogies and Biographical Sketches, p. 111. Cause of death was scarlet fever. G&BS, p. 111.
                  
13
Birth:
20 May 1839
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
12 Nov 1911
Lordsburg, Hidalgo co, Nm, Usa
Marr:
26 Oct 1859
Bourbon co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   age 12


Name in VanMeter Family Bible is given as "Abraham."  Name in G&BS is given as "Abram."  B.F. VanMeter provides names and dates of birth of children. G&BS, p. 113.

In 1870 U.S. Census for Clark County, Kentucky, listed as living with wife, Annie E., age 31, daughter, "Nettie," age 10, and three sons, "J. K.," age 8, "W. M.," age 5,  and Isaac, age 2; occupation given as "farmer;" value of real estate, $60,000, value of personal estate, $13,200.

Stationary:    "Abram VanMeter, 4 miles west of Winchester, on the Lexington Pike, has for sale pure-bred short-horns, Berkshire, Chester, and Yorkshire hogs from imported stock."

Moved to Cooke County, Texas in 1876.  Obituary, Annie E. VanMeter.

In 1880 U.S. Census for Cooke County (6th Precinct), Texas, listed as living with wife, Ann, age 36, daughter, Leta, age 18, son, Jonah, age 17, son, Walter, age 15, son, Isaac, age 13, daughter, Lizzie, age 11, daughter, Ann B., age 9; occupation given as "farmer;" daughters all listed as "at home," and occupation of sons given as "farmer."

In 1900 U.S. Census for Cooke County (6th Precinct), Texas, listed as living with wife, Anna E., and two sons, Walter M., age 35,  and Thomas M., age 17; occupation given as "farmer;" lists Anna E. as being mother of eight (8) children, five (5) of whom are then living.

Moved to Lordsburg, Hidalgo County, New Mexio in 1908.  Obituary, Annie E. VanMeter

Date of death from Louis Marshall VanMeter family bible; date and place of death from Cemetery Record, Cooke County, Texas, p. 401.
                  
14
Birth:
28 Feb 1841
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
27 Sep 1924
Dade City, Pasco co, Fl, Usa
Marr:
28 Sep 1865
Clark co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   or 8 Feb 1841

Section K, lot 37

Lewis, age 10


Date of birth from VanMeter Family Bible and G&BS, p. 113; date of marriage, and dates of birth for spouse and children from Louis Marshall VanMeter family bible.

Educated at Transylvania University; served three years in Southern Army, initially serving as First Lieutenant in W.C.P. Breckenridge's company. G&BS, pp. 113-14. Joined Morgan's command, Ninth Kentucky Cavalry, after Battle of Cynthiana [July 1862 (?)]; served at Chickamauga and Missionary Ridge, and also fought during Sherman's march through Georgia. G&BS, pp. 117-21. Tombstone states military service as "2d LT, Co. E, 9 KY CAV CSA."

Names of wife and children from G&BS, p. 114. Sold farm in Clark County, Kentucky, bought farm in Shelby County, Kentucky in May, 1889. Farm sold in 1900's; in deed dated October, 1907, L. M. VanMeter, wife Nannie E. VanMeter, son, Ben S. VanMeter, daughter-in-law, Bessie H. VanMeter, and daughter, Nannie M. VanMeter, are stated to be living in Shelby County, Kentucky.

Listed in 1900 U.S. Census for Shelbyville, Shelby County, Kentucky; gives names and months of birth of wife and children: wife, Nannie E.; children, Mariah B., John D., Lewis M., Jr., Nancy M., and Ben S. L. M. VanMeter signed the marriage bond for son, Ben Stonesteet VanMeter's, marriage license in 1905.  By 1910, deed of release states Nannie E. VanMeter and L.M. VanMeter are living in Dade City, Pasco County, Florida. Deed Book I-4, page 110, Shelby County Clerk's office. In 1917 deed, L.M. VanMeter is described as widower living in Dade City, Pasco County, Florida.  Deed Book P-4, page 138, Shelby County Clerk's office.

Date and place of death, date of interment from records of Grove Hill Cemetery, Shelbyville, Kentucky.
                  
15
Birth:
21 Jun 1842
Clark co, Ky, Usa
Death:
8 Feb 1925
Danville, Boyle co, Ky, Usa
Marr:
29 Mar 1866
Danville, Boyle co, Ky, Usa 
Individual Information
Notes:
                   Section D, lot 5

age 8


Benjamin F. VanMeter, Genealogies and Biographical Sketches, pp. 133-35:    "John Milton, ninth son and youngest child of Isaac Van Meter and his wife, Rebecca, was born June 21, 1842; graduated at Center College, Danville, Kentucky; enlisted in the Southern Army in 1862, and served to the close of the war in Captain Nicholas' company of Colonel Cluke's regiment of General Morgan's command; was surrendered by Morgan and Cluke, and taken prisoner on the famous Ohio raid, and remained in prison eighteen months.

"After the close of the war he married Alice Yerkes, of Danville, Kentucky, in March, 1866, and has four daughters, viz: Amanda Yerkes, Susan Allan, Elizabeth S., and Alice.

"After the war he also graduated in law, and practiced for a few years in Lexington, Kentucky, but soon returned to his farm and followed that occupation since. For more than ten years he lived on a fine farm in Woodford County, Kentucky, but has since and to the present time resided on a farm three miles from Danville, in Boyle County, Kentucky. Is a prominent farmer and a useful and efficient elder of the Presbyterian Church.

"John M. Van Meter enlisted in the Confederate Army when Generals Bragg and Kirby Smith invaded Kentucky in 1862, in Company E, Eighth Kentucky Cavalry. His first service was in Eastern Kentucky with General John H. Morgan, trying to prevent the escape of Federal General George Morgan from Cumberland Gap to Ohio, hoping to co-operate with General John S. Williams' command in its advance from West Virginia for the same purpose, but General George Morgan eluded both armies through the mountains and made his escape to Ohio. General John Morgan's command then returned to Central Kentucky, and a day or two after the Perryville battle it skirmished with the advance guard of General Buell on the Clark farm, near Danville, Kentucky, but finally after maneuvering on the flank and rear of the Federal Army, Morgan's command fell back through Cumberland Gap into East Tennessee; thence through Kingston and over the mountains to Murfreesboro into Middle Tennessee, and made a brilliant fight at Hartsville, where Morgan with 1,100 men surprised and captured 2,400 Federals.

"The next important move was the Christmas raid of General Morgan on the Louisville & Nashville Railway into Kentucky, when the road was torn up as far as to Elizabethtown. Then after falling back into Tennessee, John M. Van Meter went with his regiment, detached and under command of Colonel R. S. Cluke, and made a raid into Central and Eastern Kentucky, thus returning for the first time to his home and native county and giving a great surprise to friend and foe. Colonel Cluke made a very successful raid, taking many more Federal prisoners than he commanded of Confederates, with immense quantity of army stores, wagons, mules, etc. He could only parole the soldiers, burn the stores and wagons, and take the drove of mules and horses out with him. This was in the months of January and February, 1863, and he finally fell back to Monticello with very few casualties, but with very hard, laborious marching, and plenty of excitement to prevent any despondency or lack of courage.

"The next movement of importance was the Ohio raid in July, 1863, and that was almost a continuous daily skirmish from the time he crossed the Tennessee line into Kentucky until General Morgan surrendered in Ohio, up near the Pennsylvania line. John M. Van Meter surrendered on the last day of that raid with Colonel Cluke and General Morgan; was kept in prisons Camp Chase and Camp Douglas until 1865, more than eighteen months, when finally he was paroled, sent around for exchange to Richmond, Virginia; was never exchanged, but was near Appomattox when General Lee surrendered. They were to have been declared exchanged at a certain time, and had promised to not take up arms until they were exchanged, but before the time arrived General Lee surrendered.

"J. M. Van Meter relates thus: During this interval our command, just from prison, was sent up on the railroad between Lynchburg and Abingdon to be fed wherever we could get persons to keep us. We remained for a few weeks at Salem, Virginia, but after the surrender at Appomattox I left with five or six others to go toward the Mississippi River, and on this trip we spent the night near Doublin Station, in Pulaski County, Virginia, at the home of Mr. Alexander Mathews, who was away from home with his only son. During the conversation with the family, Mrs. Mathews learned that I was a son of Rebecca Cunningham, who had been a special friend and perhaps a schoolmate in former years. So, when we left next morning she called me back, after the others had gotten beyond ear-shot, and gave me $11.00 in silver and gold.

"Elias Campbell, Jessie Spencer, John "Street" Van Meter, a young Smith, and a young Veal, and perhaps a few others, whose names I do not recall, were in our party. We came to Knoxville, Tennessee, where we were arrested and required to take the oath of allegiance to the Federal Government. We were kept in camp there for a few days, and during that time I determined to see if I could not get some money from home through the banks. I saw the cashier of a national bank there, and he agreed to cash my check for $1,000.00, with $25.00 discount, if I would have $1,000.00 put to my credit in the bank of D. A. Sayre & Co., in Lexington, Kentucky, by wire. I. C. Van Meter put the money there with very little delay, and I gave the national bank in Knoxville my check for $1,000.00, and he paid me $975.00 in greenbacks. I reserved enough to get me home comfortably, and divided the balance among the boys, giving each one only what was really needed to get him home. In a short time all that I had distributed was paid back to me, and a large interest was paid in gratitude. When we arrived at Nashville we got good clothes, bathed and barbered, rode on freight cars to Louisville, and thence to Lexington. When we got to Knoxville we had much trouble in getting entertainment, even of the poorest kind; but finally were allowed to sleep on some man's kitchen floor, and while we were there the family learned that one of the men who were sleeping on the floor had cashed a check on a Lexington bank for $1,000.00, and then the family sent a basket of good things to us to atone for their treatment. There was much persecution of Southern sympathizers then at Knoxville by the Federal authorities. So that I did not blame the people for the treatment we received.

"Soon after my return home I sent a shorthorn calf to Mrs. A. Mathews, of Pulaski County, Virginia, who had so generously given me the $11.00 in specie, and named the calf Token. I could think of nothing that would be of more real benefit to that naturally great cattle country, to rebuild the interest there, than a pure bred shorthorn bull, and years afterward I heard with great satisfaction of the benefit he had been to Mr. Mathews and that country in the improvement of cattle stock."


Married Alice Yerkes, born August 19, 1843 in Maryland, the daughter of Rev. Stephen Yerkes and Amanda Lovell; children, Ama Y., Susan A., Adie L. (deceased), John M. (deceased), Lizzie S., and Alice Y.; graduated from Centre College in 1862, and from the Law Department of the Kentucky [Transylvania] University at Lexington, practiced law two years in partnership with Judge Morton of Lexington; in 1870, located on a farm in Woodford County, where he reamined until 1883, when he sold the farm for $120 per acre and purchased a farm of 437 acres in Boyle County, three miles south of Danville; farm is in good condition, well improved, and in a fine state of cultivation, nice herd of short horn cattle, considerable space has been devoted to fruit culture, and has one of the most extensive and thrifty vineyards in the vicinity; Elder in the Southern Presbyterian Church; in politics, a Democrat. W. H. Perrin, J. H. Battle and G. C. Kniffin, Kentucky A History of the State, 4th ed., p. 1029 (F. A. Batley and Co., Louisville & Chicago 1887)(reprinted Southern Historical Press, Greenville, SC 1979, 1992).

Obituary, The Lexington Herald, p. 1, Tuesday, February 10, 1925:     "  Funeral services for John Milton VanMeter, 82 years old, who died at his home in Danville Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock will be held this morning at 10 o'clock at the Danville Presbyterian church, of which Mr. VanMeter had served as an elder for 40 years.

"Burial will follow in the Lexington cemetery at about 12:30 o'clock.  The honorary pallbearers will be the officers of the First Presbyterian church and members of the Robert J. Breckinridge camp of Confederate veterans.

"Active pallbearers will be the nephews of the deceased, N. P. VanMeter, Field VanMeter, of Winchester; S. L. VanMeter, J. C. VanMeter, T. W. L. VanMeter, Dr. B. F. VanMeter of Lexington and C. L. Steenbergen, John W. Yerkes, of Paris.

"Mr. VanMeter was a member of a large family which has played an important part in the social, historical and economic development of central Kentucky.  The only surviving member of his family is B. F. VanMeter, Sr., of 225 South Ashland avenue, Lexington.

"  During the Civil War he was a member of John Morgan's cavalry and for many years afterwards was the commander of the Robert J. Breckinridge camp of Confederate veterans.  His wife, Miss Alice Yerkes, a daughter of the theologian and clergyman, Stephen Yerkes, of Danville, died about 12 years ago.

"The surviving children are Miss Ama Yerkes VanMeter, and Mrs. [sic] Sue VanMeter, of Danville, and Mrs. John Woodford, of Paris, and a surviving grandson, John VanMeter Woodford.  Mr. and Mrs. Woodford and the grandson were at Mr. VanMeter's bedside when he died.

"He was born in Clark County, graduated from Centre College in the class of '62, and also the law school of Transylvania College.  Upon graduation from Transylvania he became a partner in the practice of law with Judge Jere Morton, of Lexington."

Date of birth from VanMeter Family Bible


KY Death Record: VanMeter,  John  M., age 82, place of death: Boyle, date of death:  02-08-1925  vol. 006, certif. no. 02879, year 1925.
                  
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Isaac Van Meter - Rebecca Cunningham

Isaac Van Meter was born at Old Fields, Hardy co, Va, Usa 24 Sep 1794. His parents were Jacob Van Meter and Tabitha Inskeep.

He married Rebecca Cunningham 17 Jun 1817 at Clark co, Ky, Usa . Rebecca Cunningham was born at Hardy co, Va, Usa 14 Oct 1800 daughter of Isaac Cunningham and Sarah ÒSallieÓ Catherine Harness .

They were the parents of 15 children:
Solomon Van Meter born 10 Jul 1818.
Isaac Cunningham Van Meter born 8 Oct 1820.
Jacob Van Meter born 10 Feb 1822.
Van Meter born 23 Oct 1823.
Sarah Ann Van Meter born 26 Oct 1825.
Susan Tabitha Van Meter born 1 Aug 1827.
Rebecca Hannah Van Meter born 27 Jan 1829.
Amanda Ellis Van Meter born 25 Oct 1830.
William Cunningham Van Meter born 16 Jun 1832.
Benjamin Franklin Van Meter born 30 Jan 1834.
Thomas Cunningham Van Meter born 29 Oct 1835.
Eliza Caroline Van Meter born 13 Sep 1837.
Abraham Van Meter born 20 May 1839.
Louis Marshall Van Meter born 28 Feb 1841.
John Milton Van Meter born 21 Jun 1842.

Isaac Van Meter died 8 Oct 1854 at Clark co, Ky, Usa .

Rebecca Cunningham died 20 Feb 1864 at Clark co, Ky, Usa .

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